Delaware Becomes First State to Legalize Sports Betting

Delaware Becomes First State to Legalize Sports Betting

On Tuesday, May 14th, Delaware became the first state in the nation to legalize sports betting following the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) in May 2018. This historic decision opens the door for other states to legalize sports betting, as well as for individual casinos and racetracks to offer it.

Under the new law, which takes effect on June 5th, people ages 21 and over will be allowed to place bets on professional and college sports at Delaware’s three casinos and at its race tracks. The state will also offer online sports betting through its casinos’ websites.

Delaware’s General Assembly first legalized parlay betting – a type of sports betting that involves picking multiple outcomes of a sporting event – in 1976. The state then legalized single-game betting in 2009. But PASPA outlawed both forms of sports betting, leaving Delaware residents unable to bet on the NFL, MLB, NBA, or NCAA games.

The repeal of PASPA was a major victory for gambling proponents who argued that the law was outdated and infringed on states’ rights. Gambling supporters also contended that legalization would generate revenue for states and create jobs.

Opponents of gambling argue that it can lead to addiction and financial ruin. They also say that it has negative social consequences, such as increased crime rates.

So far, six states have approved laws legalizing sports betting following the Supreme Court’s decision: Delaware, New Jersey, Mississippi, West Virginia, Rhode Island, and Pennsylvania. Other states are likely to follow suit in the coming months and years.

NY and PA Could Be Next to Follow Delaware’s Lead

New York and Pennsylvania are among the states that could be next to legalize same-sex marriage, following Delaware’s lead.

Delaware became the eleventh state to legalize same-sex marriage on Tuesday, after the General Assembly passed a bill to legalize the unions. Governor Jack Markell is expected to sign the bill into law.

“We are excited that Delaware will soon join the many states that recognize that all families deserve the same respect and protections under the law,” said Lisa Goodman, president of Equality Delaware in a statement.

New York is currently considering a bill to legalize same-sex marriage, and Governor Andrew Cuomo has said he would sign it into law if it passes the legislature. The state’s Attorney General, Eric Schneiderman, has also come out in support of gay marriage.

Pennsylvania is also considering a bill to legalize same-sex marriage. The state’s Senate passed a measure legalizing gay marriage earlier this year, but it was blocked by the House of Representatives.

Sports Gambling Likely to be Legalized by Federal Government

Legal sports gambling is on the horizon for the United States. The federal government is likely to legalize it in the near future, opening up the market for states to regulate and tax it.

The Department of Justice recently reversed its position on a federal law that bans sports gambling. The change in position paves the way for states to legalize and regulate sports betting within their borders. Many states are expected to move quickly to take advantage of this opportunity.

Opponents of legalized sports gambling argue that it will lead to increased addiction and crime rates. However, supporters say that it will bring much-needed revenue to states, and will create jobs in the gaming industry.

It is estimated that legalized sports gambling could generate up to $200 billion in revenue annually. This would be a major windfall for cash-strapped states. It is also likely to create thousands of new jobs in the gaming industry.

If you are interested in betting on sports, now is the time to get into the market. Sports betting will soon be legalized nationwide, and there is sure to be a lot of excitement surrounding this development. Make sure you stay ahead of the curve by getting familiar with the relevant laws and regulations in your state.

Proposed Bill in Congress Aims to Legalize Sports Betting

A new proposed bill in the House of Representatives would legalize sports betting in the United States. The bill, called the “Safe and Secure Federal Sports Betting Act”, was introduced by Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) on Wednesday.

Under the proposed bill, states would be responsible for regulating and taxing sports betting. In addition, the legislation would create a new federal regulatory body to oversee sports betting operations.

“It’s time to bring this multibillion-dollar industry out of the shadows and into the sunlight,” said Gaetz in a statement.

The proposed bill faces an uphill battle in Congress, where many lawmakers are opposed to legalizing sports betting. However, with more and more states moving to legalize sports betting, it is possible that Congress may eventually act to regulate the industry at the federal level.

What is the Safe and Secure Federal Sports Betting Act?

The Safe and Secure Federal Sports Betting Act is a proposed bill in the House of Representatives that would legalize sports betting in the United States. The bill was introduced by Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) on Wednesday, January 24th.

Under the proposed bill, states would be responsible for regulating and taxing sports betting. In addition, the legislation would create a new federal regulatory body to oversee sports betting operations.

“It’s time to bring this multibillion-dollar industry out of the shadows and into the sunlight,” said Gaetz in a statement.

The proposed bill faces an uphill battle in Congress, where many lawmakers are opposed to legalizing sports betting. However, with more and more states moving to legalize sports betting, it is possible that Congress may eventually act to regulate the industry at the federal level.

Supreme Court Ruling on New Jersey Gambling Case Could Open Up Sports Betting Nationwide

In a decision that could have far-reaching implications for the gambling industry, the United States Supreme Court ruled today in favor of New Jersey in its long-running dispute with the federal government over sports betting.

The Court’s 6-3 ruling struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA), a 1992 law that had prohibited most states from authorizing sports betting. New Jersey had argued that the law was unconstitutional, claiming that it violated the Tenth Amendment by infringing on state sovereignty.

Writing for the majority, Justice Samuel Alito Jr. said that PASPA “unequivocally dictates what States may and may not do. It prohibits State Authorization of all forms of gambling, including lottery schemes, casino gaming, and sports betting.”

“This is a victory for the people of New Jersey and for the Constitution,” said New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy in a statement following the ruling. Murphy, who took office earlier this year, has made legalizing sports betting one of his top priorities.

The decision opens the door for other states to legalize sports betting, which could generate billions of dollars in revenue for state governments. Delaware, Mississippi, Nevada and West Virginia already have some form of legal sports betting, while several other states are expected to follow suit quickly now that PASPA has been struck down.

The NFL, NBA, MLB and NCAA had all opposed New Jersey’s efforts to repeal PASPA, arguing that expanding legalized sports betting would damage the integrity of their games. But Justice Alito dismissed those concerns in his opinion, writing that “listing all of these reasons does not answer the central question presented here: whether Congress can prevent States from repealing laws that prohibit or regulate private conduct. The answer is no.”

Major league teams and players will now likely begin pushing for a piece of the legalized sports betting pie, seeking to gain an edge on their competitors by getting favorable odds or marketing deals with casinos and bookmakers.

The Court’s ruling is also likely to increase scrutiny on so-called “daily fantasy contests” such as those offered by companies like DraftKings and FanDuel. While those contests are currently legal under federal law, they could come under fire from lawmakers concerned about their potential impact on traditional sports betting.